WELCOME! BENVENUTI!

WECOME! BENVENUTI

Thanks for your visit! Please note that poetry and translations here, beginning August 30, 2013, may be additionally translated via the sidebar link. Y ou may contact me at jenneandrews2010@gmail.com .

Grazie per la vostra visita! Si prega di notare che la poesia e traduzioni qui, a partire 30 ago 2013, può essere ulteriormente tradotto tramite il link alla destra. Si possa contattarmi all'indirizzo jenneandrews2010@gmail.com.

Benvenuti nel blog traduzione di la poetessa Americana Jenne 'R. Andrews. Fin dalla sua nascita ho postato poesia in inglese al blog. Ma io sono venuto da un meraviglioso cornucopia di amicizie con scrittori e intellettuali italiani, la maggioranza dei quali siciliana. Questi meravigliosi gente è stata così gentile da leggere il mio lavoro. Anzi la mia poesia è stata tradotta nel italiano dal Il professore Signore Marco Giuffrida, Vicenza, Italia e siciliano di nascita. Egli è un brillante gentiluomo; uno scienziato, umanitaria e pensatore e voglio mostrare il mio recente lavoro nel suo linguaggio e attraverso entrambi i nostri occhi. Anche se possa usare il “gadget” di tradurre sulla destra.

Quindi, per il momento sembra che questo blog, La Parola Vivace, è l'luogo perfetta per i nostri sforzi congiunti. Spero che ti piace l'esperienza della lettura del lavoro in una o entrambe le lingue.

Welcome to the translation blog of Colorado poet Jenne’ R. Andrews. Since its inception I have posted drafts in English to the blog. But I have come by a wonderful cornucopia of friendships with Italian writers and intellectuals, the majority of whom are Sicilian. These wonderful, warm people have been kind enough to read my work. My poetry has been translated into Italian by Professor Marco Giuffrida, Vicenza, Italy and Sicilian by birth. He is a brilliant gentleman; a scientist, humanitarian and thinker and I want to showcase my recent work in his language and through both our eyes.

Hence, for the time being it seems that this blog, La Parola Vivace, is the perfect home for our joint efforts. I hope that you enjoy the experience of reading the work in either or both languages.


Tuesday, February 7, 2012

New Poem: Fantasia, Posting for DVerse OLN and Beyond...

photo internet fair use from lovescylla.com

Fantasia

No one had ever seen such grief and terror;
she fled the shadows of day as if she were leaping
ice floe to ice floe—could they not see
the great owls with extended claws following her,

The colossal winging griffins of shame,
the billowing blue elephants of regret,
the hounds of failure all with their
hot, rancid breath?

And her predatory insomnia—no one had ever seen
such sleeplessness-- someone sitting upright
in the withered gardens the night long,
listening for footfalls on the perimeter.

Have you seen the great and gaping roses,
how they gasp for air like wounds,
the tiny clutching hand of their leaves,
their oozing topaz nectar?

The aberrations of the universe have us
by the throat, waterfalls of starlight and impotence
of all the clock-towers, the port city crumbling
at last, after centuries of its feet webbing
the salt-laved rock;

Despite all petition, the inhabitants of
le bonne village devolving into the deep.

ii

What is to become of the poet?
She loves the soporifics of transport:
out of the body and into the sea light,
the shooting stars over the villas rocking
in their niches in the cliff.
She loves the legend, the music
the tide.

She mercilessly drives herself;
she cooks she sings she paints,
she writes and writes,
she never sleeps.
She is a hardware store candle
infused with citronella, hardy
spending herself, using up
her own rivulets of tallow,
her white flame keening in the dark.

iii

What is to become of the one
she wanted to be; out there
you can see her sailing, outfitted
with a new body.

She left the other behind
in a trade of opium for pounds of flesh.
She shed her decrepitude,
strapped on her new legs, striding
out fathom on fathom.

It is true that madness is a tidal thing
ebbing and flowing and the tinnitus
of the damned on the edge of sleep,
the echo of litanies of mercy,

The flawed sleep that is like falling,
flailing in air veering away
from the rock face,
the cord snapping: oh martyrs
who falls on his sword for her?

Over and over she does this for herself,
sheds grief’s robe like a falcon
his hood, and with her Wagnerian
battle cry, takes to the air.



When and if you have time please check out my review of Cary Waterman's Book of Fire live at Loquaciously Yours...many thanks.  xxj

copyright Jenne' R. Andrews 2012

13 comments:

zongrik said...

The aberrations of the universe have us by the throat ->

not really the universe, but of society. the psychopaths, the sociopaths, the evil and the good intentioned liberals who give EVERYONE the same rights and liberties, even if they are to take advantage of them in the worst ways, have us by the throat.

many good people believe that fighting is bad, even if it means fighting back, and that weakens the ones who are willing to fight.

thanks for your support on my page.

Divalounger said...

Just gorgeous writing! I love your imagery and use of metaphor--this piece just sings to me--

@AudreyHowitt

kez said...

Brilliant read thank you x

Brian Miller said...

i feel this is a very personal poem...particularly those last two...using up her own tallow...wishing to be in a new body out...i think it is something many of us can relate to ...and so we write...

Timoteo said...

So many lines to love...

I especially like :

...waterfalls of starlight and impotence...

and

...the billowing blue elephants of regret...

Natasha Head said...

Fantastic! (and much gratitude for your good eye at my space!)

Laurie Kolp said...

Jenne- I really like this, especially ii.

http://lkkolp.wordpress.com/2012/02/07/granted-constitutional-rights/

Beachanny said...

Jenne, yours is another unique and personal voice. Each poem seems to expand on the last broadening the landscape of your personal vision, and casting a look into a universe of possibilities, or possible "others" where each of us can wander and wonder. The preciousness and tenuousness of life is always present in your work. It makes me think.

John Richter said...

Definitely a keepr Jenne!

Mystic_Mom said...

So personal and yet so universal, such vivid images and strong feelings rolling along with your lyrical words. Bless you Jenne! xoxo

Manicddaily said...

Hi Jenne, this is a very sad but glorious poem too. There are many many memorable lines--the grasping roses, the predatory insomnia, the citronella poet, the flying other, the new legs, the traded decrepitude, the Wagnerian aria, the swooping owl, the blue elephants of regret--I'm just going through by my memory (which is not great), the teeny hands of leaves and topaz nectar--

Of course, it also adds up to a greater whole, but there are such wonderful building blocks there in your images. K.

Manicddaily said...

Agh, Jenne, I left a comment that did not take. I'm having a great deal of trouble with commenting lately.

A beautiful heartfelt poem--so many memorable images adding up to the whole-- I had made a whole list--blue elephants, regret, citronella candle poet, grasping leaves of rose, Wagner, legs, predatory insomnia==this is just a part of list as now I must rush. Wonderful, hope this takes. K.

Manicddaily said...

Dear Jenne,

I'm having such problems commenting from my home computer that a little worried my comment didn't "take". A lovely poem, with so many great images--I have listed the ones that stuck with me a few times! The blue elephants of regret, the predatory insomnia, the grasping roses, the Wagner aria, the legs, the Citronella poet--terribly sad, of course, but inspiring--the song palpable. k.