WELCOME! BENVENUTI!

Jenne' Andrews is an American poet. She has three published chapbooks including the recent Blackbirds Dance in the Empire of Love, Finishing Line Press 2013.

A full-length collection, Reunion, Lynx House Press, was published in 1983; after a long hiatus to raise Golden Retrievers in Colorado, recent work has appeared in The Passionate Transitory, Belletrist Coterie, The Adirondack Review and Vox Populi, a journal of culture, politics and poetry published and edited by the august Michael Simms.

A bilingual collection of "Italiana," Bocca, Voce, Delirio, with translations by Lorenzo Luciani, will be released by Finishing Line at the end of 2016 and her latest collection, And Now, the Road, a finalist for the Autumn House prize in 2014, will be released by Salmon Poetry Ltd, Ireland, a highly regarded international house, Jessie Lendennie, Publisher, circa 2017.

Andrews holds the MFA in Creative Writing/Poetry from Colorado State University, is a literary fellow of the National Endowment for the Arts, and was full-time Poet in Residence for the St. Paul Schools from '74-78. She lived in St. Paul from 1971-78 during the first wave of the Twin Cities literary renaissance, and spent the summer of 1973 in Reggio Calabria, Italy.

The poet lives in northern Colorado's Poudre River Valley with her husband, fiction writer Jack Brooks; the couple has recently imported two British Golden Retrievers and expects a litter in June-- see the Ardorgold website for details. Contact: jenneandrews2010@gmail.com .

Saturday, January 21, 2012

New Poem: Aquello Arroyo for DVerse Poetics and DVerse OLN

Aquello Arroyo

An arroyo is a gash in the earth
Made by the hard loving of water
Coursing in jubilance
With the knife of its passion

An arroyo is a gash in the soul
A rivulet swollen with betrayal
Where two stand on opposite sides
Los dos, que fueron amantes
The two that were lovers

One wants to turn back
One wants to cross
Both have dreamt
of another country

But what border and into what 
frontier
The border of night
The border of honey
Where the eagles of darkness await

Los ochos que fueron ciegos
Those eyes that were blind

Open now, swiveling in their briny heads
The spine is electric with folly
The legs are taut with the desire to run

Now comes the caballo of possibility
La yegua blanca, the white mare 
kicking up the dust

What crosses the border
Spans the arroyo
Claims time with the mere span
Of its wings?

This is no riddle
We gash the earth
We gouge the other
We cloak ourselves in night
We plummet to make a kill

Yet it is the winged white mare of imagination
With the power to seam and make whole
to forge on with her shoulders, to cross.


posting for DVerse Poets Pub-- prompt: write about borders/boundaries.

cc
copyright Jenne' R. Andrews  2012

19 comments:

Laurie Kolp said...

Jenne- I really like this... especially the second stanza, I guess I can relate to betrayal... that's sad isn't it? I love the ending.

http://lkkolp.wordpress.com/2012/01/22/who-cares-about-whats-that/

Brian Miller said...

nice set up but from "This is no riddle..." is certainly my fav part of this poem...condensed and direst...

i am not sure what kind of comment you were referring to in the one to me...feel free to email and enlighten me.

Heaven said...

Very lovely images ~

amyjosprague said...

Jen I really like this. I love the particular Spanish words you chose that roll off the tongue and glide with the rest of the poem. The imagery is GORGEOUS, and so sad and I felt that emptiness. Beautiful how you put it all together, you quite good at that!
Amy

Claudia said...

great imagery here as always jenne..
One wants to turn back
One wants to cross
Both have dreamt
of another country... not an easy place to be, but there are many standing on these lines, and sometimes you forget the land where you were supposed to go in the first place

manicddaily said...

Very intense imagery, and movement. So many lines I love--

This is no riddle
We gash the earth
We gouge the other
We cloak ourselves in night
We plummet to make a kill

Seems especially vivid.

My only issue, and I suggest this only because you are so good, is I found the conflict between eagles and mare confusing at moments--the wing span and the kicking up in the dust. I may be a very literal reader, but I found the abundance of the animal imagery details a bit distracting as it wasn't totally clear to me--the pair seem to have legs that want to run, but they also seem to be reflected in the eagles and the wing spans and the plummeting (while one doesn't typically think of a mare with wings.)

I think a close reading sorts it out and even a casual reader gets the gist, so much is good here, I think it would be worth perhaps clarifying or even simplifying the metaphors a little bit-- or maybe it's just the legs that want to run, or maybe the idea is that we all contain both eagle and mare (which is also true, and maybe part of what you are getting at.)

I hope you don't mind the specific critique. Your work is always so good that I feel a bit presumptuous to lodge a complaint or suggestion, especially because I may be a simple-minded sort of reader.

K.

manicddaily said...

Very intense imagery, and movement. So many lines I love--

This is no riddle
We gash the earth
We gouge the other
We cloak ourselves in night
We plummet to make a kill

Seems especially vivid.

My only issue, and I suggest this only because you are so good, is I found the conflict between eagles and mare confusing at moments--the wing span and the kicking up in the dust. I may be a very literal reader, but I found the abundance of the animal imagery details a bit distracting as it wasn't totally clear to me--the pair seem to have legs that want to run, but they also seem to be reflected in the eagles and the wing spans and the plummeting (while one doesn't typically think of a mare with wings.)

I think a close reading sorts it out and even a casual reader gets the gist, so much is good here, I think it would be worth perhaps clarifying or even simplifying the metaphors a little bit-- or maybe it's just the legs that want to run, or maybe the idea is that we all contain both eagle and mare (which is also true, and maybe part of what you are getting at.)

I hope you don't mind the specific critique. Your work is always so good that I feel a bit presumptuous to lodge a complaint or suggestion, especially because I may be a simple-minded sort of reader.

K.

Kerry O'Connor said...

One wants to turn back
One wants to cross
Both have dreamt
of another country

These are words which say so much about relationships. They will stay with me for a long time. Exquisite poetry Jenne.

jen revved said...

Thanks all! I so welcome and value your presence here on my blog... heartening! Karin, never worry-- I appreciate your affinity for my work and it's mutual! xxxj

Maureen said...

This describes divorce, though also many relationships more generally.

The lyricism in this poem makes it a standout, along with stanzas 3, 9, and 10. There's great hope in that last stanza, that imagination can give us the power to make the crossing and so be who we are, must be, can be.

zongrik said...

i love that you used ayorro for a metaphor for the human condition

cj Schlottman said...

Your first stanza sets the tone for this very visual poem. The images of eagles and mares kicking up dust jump off the page. I do so admire your work.

Namaste..........cj

Brendan said...

Getting in the the eros of place, you pick up ghosts of Paz and Machado in your wings -- a soaring, searing place, healed back in the singer's lysis. Fine job - Brendan

Brian Miller said...

swinging through again on OLN...hope you are well jenne...

Semaphore said...

I've always loved the bilingual aspect of your poetry. I try it out in a few poems, but in yours it is effortless. Here that bilingualism is perfectly-placed, underlining the different sides of the arroyo. As always, a perfect piece.

Laura said...

I love the rhythm between the earth and the humans in this piece...well done.

Timoteo said...

Fantastic, Jenne! We have lots of arroyos here in the southwest--they are sometimes places to make love on the spur of the moment while out hiking.

manicddaily said...

PS - here before. I wanted to say though that I love the title of the book. K.

Kathy Bischoping said...

A wonderful read! "The border of night / The border of honey" is stunning. The poem is full of mouths and flavours, the dry gash mouth of the arroyo and then its swollen, filled state, the honey, the dust, the brine. I always think of your poetry as painting colours and textures richly, and after this one, well, I would like something in the tears and olives vein.